AYURVEDIC MEDICINE BASTI

 

Ayurveda Medicine | Basti | Part 1

 

19.  ” And Jesus was accepted as a pupil in the

Temple Jagannath; and here He learned the Vedas

and the Manic law.” MHK

 

 

 

1. Among the Buddhist priests was one who saw a lofty

wisdom in the words that Jesus spoke.

It was Barata Arabo.

2. Together Jesus and Barata read the Jewish Psalms

and prophets; read the Vedas, the Avesta and the

wisdom of Gautama.

 

 

COLON CANCER

Butyrate, as we mentioned, is a fatty acid. Its presence contributes to a lower pH in the colon, making it slightly acidic. This acidic pH in turn provides a supportive environment in which butyrate-producing bacteria flourish. Simultaneously, a slightly acidic large intestine is also an environment that discourages colon cancer development and growth. Dietary fiber and its breakdown product, butyrate, have been found protective against colon cancer for a number of reasons.2 “Butyrate is recognized for its potential to act on secondary chemoprevention, by slowing growth and activating apoptosis (programmed cell death) in colon cancer cells.”

 

 

 

 

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WEAKNESS

WEAKNESS!

THE ROPE

 

3:103 And hold fast by the covenant of Allah all together and be not disunited. And remember Allah’s favour to you when you were enemies, then He united your hearts so by His favour you became brethren. And you were on the brink of a pit of fire, then He saved you from it. Thus Allah makes clear to you His messages that you may be guided.

 

 

MOORISH  HOLY KORAN  CHAPTER 42

Holy Instructions From the Prophet Weakness

” Vain and inconstant as thou art, O child of imperfection, how canst thou be weak? Is not inconstancy connected with frailty? Can there be vanity without infirmity? Avoid the danger of the one, and thou shalt escape the mischiefs of the other. “

 

 

UNFAMILIAR WORDS

vain (vān)
adj. vain·er, vain·est
1. Not yielding the desired outcome; fruitless: a vain attempt.
2. Lacking substance or worth: vain talk.
3. Having or showing excessive pride in one’s appearance or accomplishments; conceited.
4. Archaic Foolish.

vanity (ˈvænɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the state or quality of being vain; excessive pride or conceit
2. ostentation occasioned by ambition or pride
3. an instance of being vain or something about which one is vain
4. the state or quality of being valueless, futile, or unreal
5. something that is worthless or useless
6. (Furniture) NZ short for vanity unit
[C13: from Old French vanité, from Latin vānitās emptiness, from vānus empty]

 

frailty (ˈfreɪltɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. physical or moral weakness
2. (often plural) a fault symptomatic of moral weakness

weakness, susceptibility, fallibility, peccability a triumph of will over human frailty
weakness might, strength, fortitude, robustness
2. infirmity, poor health, feebleness, puniness, frailness She died after a long period of increasing frailty.
3. fault, failing, vice, weakness, defect, deficiency, flaw, shortcoming, blemish, imperfection, foible, weak point, peccadillo, chink in your armour She is aware of his faults and frailties.
fault asset, virtue, strong point

infirmity (ɪnˈfɜːmɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the state or quality of being infirm
2. physical weakness or debility; frailty
3. a moral flaw or failing
in•fir•mi•ty (ɪnˈfɜr mɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. a physical weakness or ailment: the infirmities of age.
2. the quality or state of being infirm; lack of strength.
3. a moral weakness or failing.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin]

variety (vəˈraɪɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the quality or condition of being diversified or various
2. a collection of unlike things, esp of the same general group; assortment
3. a different form or kind within a general category; sort: varieties of behaviour.
4. (Biology)
a. taxonomy a race whose distinct characters are insufficient to justify classification as a separate species; a subspecies
b. horticulture stockbreeding a strain of animal or plant produced by artificial breeding
5. (Theatre)
a. entertainment consisting of a series of short unrelated performances or acts, such as comedy turns, songs, dances, sketches, etc
b. (as modifier): a variety show.
[C16: from Latin varietās, from various]

 

alloy – a mixture containing two or more metallic elements or metallic and nonmetallic elements usually fused together or dissolving into each other when moltenalloy – a mixture containing two or more metallic elements or metallic and nonmetallic elements usually fused together or dissolving into each other when molten; “brass is an alloy of zinc and copper”
metal

mixture – (chemistry) a substance consisting of two or more substances mixed together (not in fixed proportions and not with chemical bonding)
heavy metal – a metal of relatively high density (specific gravity greater than about 5) or of high relative atomic weight (especially one that is poisonous like mercury or lead)

 

lan·guish (lăng′gwĭsh)

intr.v. lan·guished, lan·guish·ing, lan·guish·es
1. To be or become weak or feeble; lose strength or vigor: crops languishing from a lack of rain.
2. To exist or continue in miserable or disheartening conditions: languished away in prison.
3. To remain unattended or be neglected: legislation that continued to languish in committee.
4. To become downcast or pine away in longing: languish apart from friends and family; languish for a change from dull routine.

Dejection:

(There was about him) an air of defeat … as though all the rules he’d learned in life were, one by one, being reversed —Margaret Millar
Dampened my mood (as automatically) as would the news of an earthquake in Cincinnati or the outbreak of the Third World War —T. Coraghessan Boyle
Dejection seemed to transfix him, to reach down out of the sky and crash like a spike through his small rigid body —Niven Busch
Dejection settled over her like a cloud —Louis Bromfield
Depression crept like a fog into her mind —Ellen Glasgow
Depression … is like a light turned into a room —only a light of blackness —Rudyard Kipling
Depressions … like thick cloud covers: not a ray of light gets through —Larry McMurtry
Despair howled round his inside like a wind —Elizabeth Bowen
Despair is like forward children, who, when you take away one of their playthings, throw the rest into the fire for madness —Pierre Charron
Despair, like that of a man carrying through choice a bomb which, at a certain hour each day, may or may not explode —William Faulkner
Despair passed over him like cold winds and hot winds coming from places he had never visited —Margaret Millar
Despondency … lurking like a ghoul —Richard Maynard
Emptied, like a collapsed balloon, all the life gone out of him —Ben Ames Williams
Feeling of desperation … as if caught by a chain that was slowly winding up —Victor Hugo
Feel like a picnicker who has forgotten his lunch —Frank O’Hara
(I’m not feeling very good right now. I) feel like I’ve been sucking on a lot of raw eggs —Dexter Manley, of the Washington Redskins after his team lost important game, quoted in the New York Times, December 8, 1986

 

nau·se·ate (nô′zē-āt′, -zhē-, -sē-, -shē-)
intr. & tr.v. nau·se·at·ed, nau·se·at·ing, nau·se·ates
1. To feel or cause to feel nausea. See Usage Note at nauseous.
2. To feel or cause to feel loathing or disgust. See Synonyms at disgust.

 

satiety

noun
The condition of being full to or beyond satisfaction:
engorgement, repletion, satiation, surfeit.

sa·ti·ate (sā′shē-āt′)
tr.v. sa·ti·at·ed, sa·ti·at·ing, sa·ti·ates
1. To satisfy (an appetite, for example) fully.
2. To provide (someone) with more than enough; glut.
adj. (-ĭt) Archaic
Filled to satisfaction.

 

es·teem (ĭ-stēm′)
tr.v. es·teemed, es·teem·ing, es·teems
1. To regard with respect; prize. See Synonyms at appreciate.
2. To regard as; consider: esteemed it an honor to help them.
n.
1. Favorable regard; respect. See Synonyms at regard.
2. Archaic Judgment; opinion.

 

ad·mi·ra·tion (ăd′mə-rā′shən)
n.
1. A feeling of strong approval or delight with regard to someone or something: the students’ admiration for their teacher. See Synonyms at regard.
2. The state of being viewed with such approval or delight: an actor held in admiration by her peers.
3. The object of such approval and delight: a movie that was the admiration of many critics.
4. Archaic The action of wondering; marveling.

 

rap·ture (răp′chər)
n.
1. The state of being transported by a lofty emotion; ecstasy.
2. often raptures An expression of ecstatic feeling: raptures of joy.
3.
a. The transporting of a person from one place to another, especially to heaven, by supernatural means.
b. Rapture An event in the eschatology of certain Christian groups in which believers in Christ will be taken up to heaven either prior to or at the Second Coming.
tr.v. rap·tured, rap·tur·ing, rap·tures

To enrapture.
[Obsolete French, abduction, carrying off, from rapt, carried away, from Old French rat, from Latin raptus; see rapt.]

TRANQUILLITY

Noun 1. tranquillity – an untroubled statetranquillity – an untroubled state; free from disturbances
quiet, tranquility
order – established customary state (especially of society); “order ruled in the streets”; “law and order”
2. tranquillity – a state of peace and quiettranquillity – a state of peace and quiet
quietude, quietness, tranquility
calmness – a feeling of calm; an absence of agitation or excitement
peace of mind, ataraxis, peacefulness, repose, serenity, peace, heartsease – the absence of mental stress or anxiety
easiness, relaxation – a feeling of refreshing tranquility and an absence of tension or worry; “the easiness we feel when sleeping”
3. tranquillity – a disposition free from stress or emotiontranquillity – a disposition free from stress or emotion
serenity, tranquility, placidity, repose, quiet
calm, calmness, composure, equanimity – steadiness of mind under stress; “he accepted their problems with composure and she with equanimity”
ataraxia – peace of mind

 

ec·sta·sy (ĕk′stə-sē)
n. pl. ec·sta·sies
1. Intense joy or delight.
2. A state of emotion so intense that one is carried beyond rational thought and self-control: an ecstasy of rage.
3. The trance, frenzy, or rapture associated with mystic or prophetic exaltation.
4. often Ecstasy Slang MDMA.
[Middle English extasie, from Old French, from Late Latin extasis, terror, from Greek ekstasis, astonishment, distraction, from existanai, to displace, derange : ek-, out of; see ecto- + histanai, to place; see stā- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

 

 

con•tent•ment (kənˈtɛnt mənt)

n.
1. the state of being contented.
2. something that contents.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Middle French]

contentment – happiness with one’s situation in life
happiness – emotions experienced when in a state of well-being
satisfaction – the contentment one feels when one has fulfilled a desire, need, or expectation; “the chef tasted the sauce with great satisfaction”
discontent, discontentedness, discontentment – a longing for something better than the present situation

contentment
noun satisfaction, peace, content, ease, pleasure, comfort, happiness, fulfilment, gratification, serenity, equanimity, gladness, repletion, contentedness I cannot describe the feeling of contentment that was with me at that time.
discomfort, discontent, dissatisfaction, unhappiness, displeasure, uneasiness, discontentment

 

mel·an·chol·y (mĕl′ən-kŏl′ē)
n.
1. Sadness or depression of the spirits; gloom.
2. Pensive reflection or contemplation.
3. Archaic
a. Black bile.
b. An emotional state characterized by sullenness and outbreaks of violent anger, believed to arise from an excess of black bile.
adj.
1. Feeling, showing, or expressing depression of the spirits; sad or dejected. See Synonyms at sad.
2. Causing or tending to cause sadness or gloom: a letter with some melancholy news.
3. Pensive; thoughtful.
[Middle English malencolie, melancolie, from Old Fren
ch, from Late Latin melancholia, from Greek melankholiā : melās, melan-, black + kholē, bile; see ghel-2 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]
mel′an·chol′i·ly adv.

 

lib•er•al•i•ty (ˌlɪb əˈræl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the quality or condition of being liberal.
2. breadth of mind.
3. broadness or fullness, as of proportions.
4. liberalism.

liberality – an inclination to favor progress and individual freedom
liberalness
tolerance – willingness to recognize and respect the beliefs or practices of others
2. liberality – the trait of being generous in behavior and temperament
liberalness
generosity, generousness – the trait of being willing to give your money

 

ag·o·ny (ăg′ə-nē)
n. pl. ag·o·nies
1.
a. The suffering of intense physical or mental pain: The injured soldier writhed in agony.
b. An instance of such suffering: the agonies of adolescence.
2. A sudden or intense emotion: “Jones then fell upon his knees, and kissed her hand in an agony of joy” (Henry Fielding).
3. A violent, intense struggle, especially the struggle that precedes death.

 

pre•em•i•nence or pre-em•i•nence (priˈɛm ə nəns)

n.
the state or character of being preeminent.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Late Latin]

pre·em·i·nent (prē-ĕm′ə-nənt)
adj.
Superior to or notable above all others; outstanding. See Synonyms at famous.
[Middle English, from Latin praeēminēns, present participle of praeēminēre, to excel : prae-, pre- + ēminēre, to stand out; see eminent.]

 

Top Ten Phraseology

1. Wherein art thou most weak? In that wherein thou seemest most strong; in that wherein most thou glorieth; even in possessing the things which thou hast; in using the good that is about thee.

 

2. Know that to be content, is to be happy.

3. Variety is to thee in the place of pleasure; but that which permanently delighteth, must be permanent.

 

4. Is there any thing in which thy weakness appeareth more, than in desiring things? It is in the possessing, and in the using of them.

5. Good things cease to be good in our enjoyment of them.

6. Allah hath given thee no good, without its admixture of evil;

 

7. As joy is not without its alloy of pain, so neither is sorrow without its portion of pleasure. Joy and grief, though unlike, are united.

 

8. The best things in the hands of a fool may be turned to his destruction; and out of the worst, the wise will find means of good.

 

9. So blended is weakness in thy nature, O man, that thou hast not strength either to be good nor to be evil, entirely.

 

10. If thou behold thy brother in the agonies of slow death, is not mercy to put a period to his life? And is it not also death to be his murderer?

 

11. Truth is but one; thy doubts are of thine own raising. He who made virtues what they are, planted in thee a knowledge of their pre-eminence.

 

The Holy Koran of the Moorish Science Temple of America

Divinely Prepared by the Noble Prophet
Drew Ali

By the guiding of his father God, Allah; the great God of the universe. To redeem man from his sinful and fallen stage of humanity back to the highest plane of life with his father God, Allah.

Chapter XLII

Holy Instructions From the Prophet Weakness
1. Vain and inconstant as thou art, O child of imperfection, how canst thou be weak? Is not inconstancy connected with frailty? Can there be vanity without infirmity? Avoid the danger of the one, and thou shalt escape the mischiefs of the other.

2. Wherein art thou most weak? In that wherein thou seemest most strong; in that wherein most thou glorieth; even in possessing the things which thou hast; in using the good that is about thee.

3. Art not thy desires also frail? Or knoweth thou even what it is thou wouldst wish? When thou hast obtained what most thou soughteth after, behold, it contenteth thee not.

4. Wherefore loseth the pleasure that is before thee its relish? And why appeareth that which is yet to come the sweeter? Because thou art wearied with the good of this, because thou knoweth not the evil of that which is not with thee. Know that to be content, is to be happy.

5. Couldst thou choose for thyself, would thy Creator lay before thee all that thy heart could ask for, would happiness then remain with thee, or would joy always dwell in thy gates?

6. Alas! Thy weakness forbiddeth it; thy infirmity declareth against it. Variety is to thee in the place of pleasure; but that which permanently delighteth, must be permanent.

7. When that is gone, thou repenteth the loss of it; though, while it was with thee, thou despiseth it.

8. That which succeedeth it, hath no more pleasure to thee; and thou afterwards quarreleth with thyself for preferring it; behold the only circumstances in which thou arrest not!

9. Is there any thing in which thy weakness appeareth more, than in desiring things? It is in the possessing, and in the using of them.

10. Good things cease to be good in our enjoyment of them. What nature meant pure sweets, are sources of bitterness to us, from our delights arise pain, from our joys, sorrow.

11. Be moderate in the enjoyment, and it shall remain in thy possession; let thy joy be founded on reason, and to its end shall sorrow be a stranger.

12. The delights of love are ushered in by sighs, and they terminate in languishment and dejection. The objects thou burnedeth for, nauseates with satiety; and no sooner hast thou possessed it, but thou art weary of its presence.

13. Join esteem to thy admiration, unite friendship with the love; so shalt thou find in the end content so absolute, that it surpasseth raptures, tranquility more worth than ecstasy.

14. Allah hath given thee no good, without its admixture of evil; but he hath given thee also the means of throwing off the evil from it.

15. As joy is not without its alloy of pain, so neither is sorrow without its portion of pleasure. Joy and grief, though unlike, are united. Our own choice only can give them to us entirely.

16. Melancholy itself often giveth delight, and the extremity of joys are mingled with tears.

17. The best things in the hands of a fool may be turned to his destruction; and out of the worst, the wise will find means of good.

18. So blended is weakness in thy nature, O man, that thou hast not strength either to be good nor to be evil, entirely. Rejoice that thou canst not excel in evil, and let the good that is within thy reach content thee.

19. The virtues are allotted to various stations. Seek not after impossibilities, nor grieve that thou canst not possess them all.

20. Wouldst thou at once have the liberality of the rich, and the contentment of the poor? Shall the wife of thy bosom be despised because she showeth not the virtues of the widow?

21. If thy father sink before thee in the divisions of thy country, can at once thy justice destroy him, and thy duty save his life?

22. If thou behold thy brother in the agonies of slow death, is not mercy to put a period to his life? And is it not also death to be his murderer?

23. Truth is but one; thy doubts are of thine own raising. He who made virtues what they are, planted in thee a knowledge of their pre-eminence. Act as thy soul dictates to thee, and the end shall be always right.

Credits:

Artwork:

https://quran.com/3/103

http://amicus.ie/2016/03/10/meaning-behind-the-interview-question-chapter-2-weaknesses/

http://stronginsideout.com/defining-weakness/

(http://mobile-cuisine.com/business/food-truck-business-weaknesses/

http://giteshtrivedi.com/blog/oracle-dba-training/identify-weaknesses-and-strengths-of-student/

Maulana Muhammad Ali

Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Prophet Noble Drew Ali

Moorish Holy Koran

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Moorish Sunday School

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MOORISH BAKERY | GHEE

 

MOORISH BAKERY | GHEE

 

GHEE
(CLARIFIED BUTTER)

 

 

Modern science now verifies what Ayurvedic health

science has said for thousands of years:

Ghee has a host of health and cooking benefits and

is good for the mind and spirit.

I consider ghee—a form of clarified butter—an

essential powerfood.

Here are a few benefits I’ve found through my years

of using ghee. (And if you’re new to ghee, here’s a

tutorial for making homemade clarified butter.)

Great For Cooking and Taste

1. Ghee has a high smoke point (250 °C or 482 °F).
You can cook and fry with ghee and it will not break

down into free radicals like many other oils.

2. Ghee does not spoil easily so it does not need

refrigeration.

Some ghee mixtures last up to 100 years.

3. Ghee is not likely to affect people with a dairy or

casein intolerance.

Ghee is made from butter but the milk solids and

impurities have been removed, so most people who are

lactose or casein intolerant have no issue with ghee.

15 Amazing Benefits of Ghee

High Nutrition:

4. Ghee is rich in the oil soluble vitamins A and E.

5. Ghee is rich in K2 and CLA (Conjugated Linoleic

Acid) – an antioxidant with anti-viral properties

if it is sourced from grass fed cows.

Energy and Weight Management

6. Ghee is Nutritionally Rich Like Coconut Oil
Ghee is rich in medium chain fatty acids, which are

absorbed directly by the liver (like carbs) and burned

as energy.

Athletes can use ghee as a consistent energy source.

15 Amazing Benefits of Ghee

7. Weight Loss

The energy from these medium chain fatty acids can be

used to burn other fats in the system and lose weight.

Digestion and Immune Strengthening Ghee

(unlike other oils) is rich in butyric acid, a short

chain fatty acid.

Beneficial intestinal bacteria convert fiber into

butyric acid and then use that for energyand

intestinal wall support.

A healthy body therefore makes its own form of

‘ghee’  but you  can aid that greatly by consuming it.

8. Healthy Digestive Tract

Research shows that people with unhealthy digestive

tracts do not produce butyric acid.

9. Healthy Immune System

Research shows that adequate production of butyric

acid supports the production of killer T cells in the

gut and thus a strong immune system.

 

10. Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Cancer

Researchers are using oral butyrate supplements and

butyrate enemas to treat inflammatory bowel diseases such

as Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis.

Ayurvedic physicians have been using ghee enemas for

centuries to decrease inflammation.

 


11. Strong Appetite Ghee stimulates the secretion

of gastric acid, thus aiding in the digestive process.

Better digestion equals better health and weight loss.

Mind and Spirit

 

15 Amazing Benefits of Ghee

 

12. Molecules of Emotion
Modern research is now revealing that negative

emotions have a chemical nature. This is what ancient

cultures have  always maintained, that the mind and

body are one.

These chemicals are attracted to and stored in fat.

Ghee can be used to replace those fats.

Plus, if used properly in a cleanse, can attract and

pull out these toxins so they can be cleansed from

the body.

13. Positive Food
Within Ayurveda, ghee is considered one of the most

satvic foods. Satvic foods promote positivity, growth

and expansion of consciousness.

14. Holy Cow
The positive subtle effects of ghee is said to come from

the fact that it comes freely from cows. Cows are

considered special or holy in many Hindu cultures.

The milk from cows therefore contains the essence of

all those energies and ghee is the essence of the milk.

Herbal Energizer

15. Fry Your Spices in Ghee

 


Many of the medicinal properties of herbs and spices

can be absorbed and transported to targeted areas of

the body with ghee. This is why Ayurveda uses ghee

in thousands of different herbal preparations.

You can do the same thing by frying your kitchen spices

in ghee before adding them to your dishes.

Making and Storing Ghee

Ghee is made the same as clarified butter, but heated

longer. Learn how to make ghee here.

The two things that will degrade ghee are water and

sunlight.

Always store your ghee in a container with a good seal

in the dark.
Ghee will last 2-3 months if you keep it in an airtight

container.
When kept in a refrigerator, without opening, ghee can

last up to a year.
Don’t Be Scared of Ghee

Ghee was once thought to be unhealthy because it is

saturated, but research has now revealed the truth

about fats and oils. Ghee is one of the seven healthy

fats you need in your kitchen.

Recipes using Ghee:

Turmeric Rice and PotatoesMung Dal Soup
Dal and RiceCardamom and Coconut Rice Palau

Related
Health Benefits of Mangos
10 Natural Remedies for Swollen Feet and Ankles
Tantric Sex for Beginners: 4 Easy Tips!

Written by Randy Fritz with Diana Herrington at

Real Food For Life

 

Directions:

Melt butter on low heat.
Butter in the pan

It will start making bubbles.
After 5 Minutes Simmering

Milk solids start to separate.
Wait until milk solids browned on the bottom of the pan.
IMG_4085

Skim the floating milk solid with fine strainer.
Skimmed Milk Solids on top Skimmed Milk Solids

Strain ghee into a glass jar and discard the browned milk solids.
Ghee

You can put your ghee in room temperature but you can also refrigerate it to be on the safe side.

Serving Size 1 tsp (7g) Servings Per Container

About 53

AMOUNT PER SERVING
Calories 70Calories from Fat 70
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 11%
Saturated Fat 4.5g 23%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 15mg
Sodium 0mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 0g 0%

Dietary Fiber 0g 0%
Sugars 0g
Protein 0g
Vitamin A 6%
Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 0%
Iron 0%

 

http://thepioneerwoman.com/http://thepioneerwoman.com/food-and-friends/how-to-make-ghee/-and-friends/how-to-make-ghee/

 

 

 

Credits:  Trader Joe’s

http://empoweredsustenance.com/benefits-of-ghee/

https://thrivemarket.com/thrive-market-ghee

http://www.gopaleo.org/all-about-ghee/

http://www.chopra.com/articles/all-about-ghee-why-it%E2%80%99s-good-for-you-and-how-to-make-it

http://lifespa.com/top-ten-reasons-cleanse-ghee/

http://www.rodalewellness.com/food/4-expert-secrets-to-eating-ghee

http://www.paleoplan.com/ingredients/ghee/

http://m.indiatimes.com/health/healthyliving/here-s-how-desi-ghee-went-from-an-indian-staple-to-an-international-superfood-254389.html

http://www.beingtheparent.com/benefits-of-ghee-for-baby/

werecipes.com

DIana Herrington

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Moorish Bakery

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2017-18

Butyrate and the Bowell pt.1

Butyrate and the Bowell  pt.1

 

BUTYRATE AND THE BOWEL, PT 1
by Risë Rafferty, RDN | August 3, 2016
Modern man has a problem with his colon, the large intestine, one’s bowels, the gut, the last processing plant in the digestive tract. Yep, whether it’s diverticulosis, diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, colon cancer, diarrhea, constipation, pain upon defecation, abdominal pain, straining, bloating, incomplete evacuation, blood in stools, sense of urgency, and so on, we’ve got problems. No doubt about it, our society is becoming increasingly aware of this important part of our anatomy and we probably all have a story to tell.

Housed within the large intestine are trillions of microbes that are referred to collectively as the microbiome, a community of various strains of bacteria, fungi, and yeasts that live and thrive in the dark, dank, recesses of our digestive tract. In their own fashion, microbes respire and digest to survive, producing byproducts that science is discovering have a potentially dramatic impact on how we feel, what we look like, our physical condition, how much energy we have, how occluded our arteries are, how resistant we are to insulin, and of course the vigor and health of its host organ, the colon.

The strains of microbes that flourish in our personal microbiome are in part determined by what you feed them. Certain strains of bacteria ferment carbohydrates that have been thus far indigestible in the digestive system. As the bacteria break these indigestible carbohydrates down, byproducts are released. Butyrate is one of these byproducts. Butyrate has nicknames by which it is also called, butyric acid and butanoic acid, but we will refer to it as butyrate. Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid. There are also long-chain and medium-chain fatty acids. These terms are simply referring to how many carbon atoms are attached to each other, literally how long an individual molecule is. Butyrate is short, with only four carbons side by side. It is one of the acids produced by resident bacteria in the large intestine. Butyrate sets itself apart from all the rest by its odor, which researchers have described as extremely pungent, much like bad smelly socks. Its contribution to our health also distinguishes it and has made it the object of much attention.

BUTYRATE HELPS HEALTHY CELLS TO GROW AND FACILITATES THE DESTRUCTION OF UNHEALTHY CELLS.
The bacteria that give birth to butyrate flourish when supplied with indigestible carbohydrates. More recognizable terms would include fiber, inulin, and resistance starch. Butyrate is one of the byproducts of bacteria breaking down these indigestible carbohydrates. Once it is produced and released into the colon, butyrate is readily absorbed by the human cells that make up the lining of the colon. It is their preferred energy source. What gas is to a car, what glucose is to the brain, what sunshine is to solar panels, butyrate is to the cells that make up the surface of the colon.

It has been suggested that the failure of butyrate to be oxidized or used for energy in ulcerative colitis is an expression of “energy deficiency disease of the colonic mucosa.”1

Butyrate regulates the production of new, fresh colon cells and the destruction of old or unhealthy colon cells. This is a process that is literally taking place all the time. The epithelial cells that line the surface of the gut have a rough life and last only five days, meaning that a four-day-old cell, lining the large intestine’s wall, is old and on its way out. The average age of the rest of the colonic cells in the main body of the gut is approximately 16 years. The surface of the colon is one of the fastest replicating tissues in the body. Butyrate provides energy and supports proliferation of colonocytes. Butyrate has been found to activate cell proliferation and maturing of healthy normal cells while inducing early apoptosis, or cell death, in cancer cells. In other words, butyrate helps healthy cells to grow and facilitates the destruction of unhealthy cells.

 

COLON CANCER

Butyrate, as we mentioned, is a fatty acid. Its presence contributes to a lower pH in the colon, making it slightly acidic. This acidic pH in turn provides a supportive environment in which butyrate-producing bacteria flourish. Simultaneously, a slightly acidic large intestine is also an environment that discourages colon cancer development and growth. Dietary fiber and its breakdown product, butyrate, have been found protective against colon cancer for a number of reasons.2 “Butyrate is recognized for its potential to act on secondary chemoprevention, by slowing growth and activating apoptosis (programmed cell death) in colon cancer cells.”3

 

DIABETES/ INSULIN SENSITIVITY

Mice received a supplement of sodium butyrate and were fed a high fat diet, 58% of the calories were from fat. Amazingly, even though the mice were fed a very high fat diet, supplementation of butyrate was found to prevent the development of insulin resistance and obesity. Fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin, and insulin tolerance were all preserved in the treated mice. Body fat content was maintained at 10% without a reduction in food intake. Calorie burning and fatty acid oxidation (fat being combusted as a fuel source) were enhanced. An increase in mitochondrial function (energy production) and biogenesis was observed in skeletal muscle and brown fat. The type I fiber was enriched in skeletal muscle. In the obese mice, supplementation of butyrate led to an increase in insulin sensitivity and a reduction in body fat.4

IMMUNITY

 

 

Short-chain fatty acids influence gut immune response, suppressing colonic inflammation. Butyrate works as an anti-inflammatory agent by inhibiting pro-inflammatory substances in the lining of the colon. It improves gut defense systems while keeping the immune system from overresponding or overreacting. A Japanese study conducted with mice demonstrated that butyrate played a role in reducing inflammation by stimulating the production of regulatory T immune cells. These immune cells hinder excessive inflammation and autoimmune disorders. When mice with colitis received butyrate supplementation, their levels of T cells increased and their symptoms improved. Dr. Hiroshi Ohno, lead researcher stated, “Therefore these findings could be applicable for the prevention and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), allergy and autoimmune disease”5

 

 

 

Credits:

W. Roediger, “The Colonic Epithelium in Ulcerative Colitis: An Energy-Deficiency Disease?,” The Lancet, http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140673680919340.
Canani, Roberto Berni et al., “Potential Beneficial Effects of Butyrate in Intestinal and Extraintestinal Diseases,” World Journal of Gastroenterology, March 28, 2011, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3070119
Ibid.
Z. Gao, J. Yin, J. Zhang, R.E. Ward, R.J. Martin, M. Lefevre, W.T. Cefalu, J. Ye, “Butyrate Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Increases Energy Expenditure in Mice,” Diabetes, July 2009, http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/58/7/1509.long.RIKEN, “Fatty acid produced by gut bacteria boosts the immune system,”
RIKEN, “Fatty acid produced by gut bacteria boosts the immune system,” ScienceDaily, November 13, 2013, www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131113132202.htm.

http://www.livestrong.com/article/542060-what-are-the-benefits-of-gaba-powder/

http://huntgatherlove.com/content/short-chain-fatty-acids-and-low-carb

http://www.lightbearers.org/butyrate-and-the-bowel-pt-1/

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